27. January 2006 · Comments Off · Categories: imported, Links

But then there was a rude interruption, as shocking as the sound of loud conversation during Figaro at Glyndebourne. “Staff call. Joanne Groomby, contact 128, Joannne Groomby.”

The oboe quartet was playing in pet foods, unnoticed by shopper Tony Middleton standing near packets of Trill. “I’m not a classical music fanatic, although I like the more popular pieces,” Mr Middleton said.

“I quite like hearing it in this setting. But my other preference would be to have no music. I like to be able to choose my music, not to have what people think I might like.”

Another cruel interruption: “Apple turnovers, three for the price of two, 75p.”

From this article.
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27. January 2006 · Comments Off · Categories: imported, Ramble

Some Opera San Jose folks might recognize the name Nmon Ford, as he sang with the company for a short while. He just received a very nice review for a performance with the LA Phil. In fact, this review is the sort we dream of. Read this, for instance


Ford wasn’t just up to the challenge. With stentorian tone, intense vibrato, superb diction and a genuinely heartfelt connection to the material, he seemed the only voice fit at the moment to bring these musical poems to life. With Conlon and an orchestra humming on all cylinders too, the performance became one of the most successful of the Philharmonic season.

Not bad, eh?
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27. January 2006 · Comments Off · Categories: imported, Links

MozartGoogle:
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27. January 2006 · Comments Off · Categories: imported

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27. January 2006 · Comments Off · Categories: imported, Ramble

I’m seeing some poetry at some rather popular (I think) music sites. Poetry that I know isn’t in the public domain yet. So maybe I was wrong when I blogged about it being illegal to put poetry up at our sites. I wonder. Anyone out there know? I’m just curious because of course I’d post poetry here if I knew I wasn’t breaking any laws.

Yes, I’m picky that way. Some of my friends would say I’m a bit nuts, in fact, about following rules.

Or maybe I’m nuts about everything. Could be.

But for now here’s a Very Bad Poem™ for you:

I don’t care what he might say
I’ll take Mozart any day.

In other news …
The rehearsal was great fun this morning. Turns out the concert is nearly sold out, too! Not bad. But having a 10:00 rehearsal has really zonked me out. I’m going to shut my eyes for a time so that I don’t shut them during oboe lessons. Sleeping on the job is such a bad idea! I did hear one story about a teacher who really did fall asleep during a lesson he was teaching. Ouch. I can’t imagine the student felt good about that. Unless she hadn’t practiced. In that case maybe she was merely relieved.
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27. January 2006 · Comments Off · Categories: imported, Ramble

HAPPY BIRTHDAY HERR MOZART!

… and now I’m off to a rehearsal. On the schedule: Mozart’s Sinfonia Concertante, K364 and Symphony No. 1, K16. WIth these folks.

Adio for now!
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27. January 2006 · Comments Off · Categories: imported, Quotes

Mozart in his music was probably the most reasonable of the world’s great composers. It is the happy balance between flight and control, between sensibility and self-discipline, simplicity and sophistication of style that is his particular province… Mozart tapped once again the source from which all music flows, expressing himself with a spontaneity and refinement and breath-taking rightness that has never since been duplicated.

-Aaron Copland, Copland on Music (1960)
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