On Pennsylvania Station’s main mezzanine, travelers are accompanied by string quartets and flute piccolos piped in over loudspeakers.

Okay … I know what a piccolo is, and I know what a flute is. But what the heck is a “flute piccolo”?

So this article tells of the different music folks are treated with at Transit Hubs, depending upon where they are.

There’s much I don’t care for about Muzak, including the fact that in reality it’s not meant to be listened to. It’s merely wallpaper.

And then there’s this

“The beauty of the Brandenburg Concertos is that you don’t necessarily have to invest yourself in them all the way,” Mr. Preston said. “It greatly enhances the atmosphere without distracting you very much.”

Okay. Whatever.

But could it also be dangerous?

“The classical music makes Pennsylvania Station feel like a nicer, safer place than it might actually be,” ….

Are we merely feeling safer because of the polite music that is being played? Then again, maybe we are:

Studies also show that rates of robbery, vandalism, and assaults on transit employees were all lowered significantly in London subway stations where classical music was played.

Well. Okay then. :-)

2 Comments

  1. This sounds like what Barenboim was talking about when he expressed how outraged he was to hear Brahms Violin Concerto in an Elevator in Chicago. He said the city of Chicago’s attitude toward classical music was kind of this “nice background music”. I guess it’s further than merely Chicago.  

  2. Patricia Mitchell

    I remember reading that. And yes, it’s further than Chicago, to be sure.

    Ah well. Maybe someone who hears something at a bus depot will get a desire to go to a symphony concert. Um. Maybe.