Each one’s musicianship has been honed by endless hours of practice and a borderline ecclesiastical dedication to canonical music: Orchestra members work 11 months a year, perform eight “surfaces” (that is, concerts and rehearsals) every week and practice at home for hours each day. (L.A. Phil players command salaries between $112,000 and $350,000 for their trouble.)

(RTWT)

Do you think, perhaps, the writer misheard the word services? I’m guessing so!

Further on in the article:

Principal oboe player Ariana Ghez is a yoga enthusiast who loves to talk politics and happens to receive a steady supply of hip-hop music — mix CDs sent by her boyfriend, who is also a principal oboist for a major orchestra she declines to identify. But the native New Yorker and Columbia University grad firmly steers conversation away from any discussion of her avocations. “To me, the most interesting dimension of what I do is what I do,” said Ghez, 28.

Heh. You can see me now, hand high in the air, waving wildly. “I know, I know!” I cry. Because I know who that boyfriend is. But I’ll remain silent on the issue, since she clearly doesn’t want us to identify him. I’m a good girl, I am. :-)

Sometimes.

Ghez goes on to say:

“Playing with this orchestra is extraordinary — really singular in terms of the level of enthusiasm — and, dare I say it, enjoyment,” she continued. “The audiences that come to our concerts tend to be a lot younger and appreciate intelligent music. I’ve been astounded by the mind-set here.”

I’d love to go hear the LA Phil at some point. I’ve yet to even drive past that shiny hall.