11. September 2008 · Comments Off · Categories: Links, Ramble

On the orchestra platform, a young percussionist in a Mask of Zorro T-shirt adjusts his cymbals. An oboist sits bolt straight in her chair brushing her teeth. A bass-violinist warms up by plucking the opening notes of Credence Clearwater Revival’s “Down on the Corner.” Another musician slumps into a bleacher seat and cracks his biology textbook to Chapter Five.

So … where does she spit? ;-) I do brush my teeth before I play if I’ve eaten and didn’t come from home, but I don’t do it in front of everyone. Seems a tad messy to me.

The article begins:

In Waite Park, Minn. — a quarry town on the outskirts of St. Cloud with a population just shy of 7,000 — something extraordinary is happening this week. More than 3,000 people have tickets for that sold-out something. One million dollars has been spent to make it happen. Its architect is Merce Cunningham, the 89-year-old man — wheelchair-bound and with a wild nest of white hair — who sat yesterday at dusk at the bottom of a Waite Park granite quarry, 150 feet below the Earth’s surface, watching and waiting.

Yes. Dance. Music. In a quarry.

I’ve done one concert in my life in a quarry. By the time I left I was covered in dust. The white dust didn’t look very good on my all black clothing. I felt as if I had been breathing it too. At that point I vowed I’d never again play in a quarry, and I haven’t. But maybe the one in Minnesota gets a good cleaning before the performers arrive. (But is it possible to clean a quarry? I have my doubts!)

You can read the whole article here.

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