12. April 2011 · Comments Off · Categories: Books

Oboe & Romance Book With CD (Sorry, I had a link to the book seller … you know … that big one, with the big name … but due to their issues with the state of California I have removed the link. You’ll need to find it elsewhere.)

These books feature 10 romantic originals for solo instrumentalists. The accompanying CD features solos with accompaniment, as well as accompaniment-only tracks for practice. Songs: Dreaming : Mood Romantic : Memory : A Song For You : Friends For Life : Nothing Has Changed : The Sound Of My Life : Teardrops : Everlasting Love : Livin’ Without You

I really think someone should put out some sort of book and CD that’s about feeling sad and morose … forget this romance stuff! ;-)

12. April 2011 · Comments Off · Categories: Pictures

Check it out! (I don’t know if I’m allowed to “borrow” the photos from the site, so just click on the link, have a look-see, and read about it.

I’d heard about the iron curtain, but never the aluminum one.

Just because I enjoyed it:

12. April 2011 · Comments Off · Categories: FBQD · Tags:

[name here] Has fallen in love with playing the oboe!!!!!!!

I LOVE this! I played Beauty and the Beast way back in June of 2000 when it was on tour and in San Francisco. Even before that I found that the music did get to me. I hear Beauty and the Beast and I get sort of emotional. I’m sure that’s silly, but there you go! I think these Disney musicals are just fun. And every girl dreams of being a princess, right?

Ya gotta love the Breaking Winds!

12. April 2011 · Comments Off · Categories: ACappellaTuesday™

Another collaborative effort with some of my faves!

Vocal multitrack collab between
JB Craipeau
Trudbol (Julien Neel)
Kartiv2

… always clever and creative! :-)

… and now I’m feeling like I really should clean my house!

12. April 2011 · 2 comments · Categories: Quotes

One thing that every genre of musician should have in common is love for what they do.

-Emily Wright

RTWT

Yes, indeed.

I really do love what I do. And still I whine. I really do think I have the coolest job(s) ever. And still I whine. I really do think oboe and English horn enable me to say things I could never say in words. And still I whine.

Time to stop.

Recently a blogger appeared to be having quite the fun time bashing a review that could be read at Examiner.com. Anyone can apply to write for the place should there be an opening. I just nearly applied for the photography opening in Chandler … wherever that is! Fortunately I didn’t submit my “sample article” even while I thought it would have won me a spot. (Not really: I wrote about my mouth and how happy my teeth are in there. Yeah, I was just being silly. I decided not to submit it, even while I think they would have gotten quite the laugh over it. Too bad for you, Examiner.com!)

But seriously, I consider Examiner.com to be a bit of a “vanity press” in most instances. I hear it pays, but I believe it’s in pennies. So if someone writes a bad review in that particular rag, I honestly don’t think it’s worth spending any blogtime over.

Now some papers, though … well … let’s take a local print (as well as online) paper. Say they did something really odd like hire a local university grad student to write a review. Say that reviewer criticized the coordination of the timpani and woodwinds in the first movement of a piece. Say there wasn’t any timpani in that movement. Say a musician had a little squawk on one note and the reviewer said the player was out of tune, unable to tell the difference between a squawk and intonation. I wouldn’t necessarily be angry at the writer but I would certainly say “Shame on you, local print (as well as online) paper!”

Or maybe I would say (or write) that. Maybe not. Maybe I’d just remain silent and hope others would correct the errors and give the newspaper “what for”.

But a local paper would never do that. Right?

12. April 2011 · Comments Off · Categories: TQOD

A kid in my writing class is paying $50k a year to study “OboePerformance.” I don’t know if I should laugh at or cry for him.