01. September 2011 · Comments Off · Categories: Opera · Tags: ,

While I shared a few “view from the pit” photos, I don’t feel comfortable sharing ones I’ve taken these past two nights from the balcony, since this is a new production. I figure I had better save them until after opening weekend. For now you’ll just have to take my word for it; it looks great! I hope you’ll consider attending. The singers are sounding wonderful, too!

Having now experienced only a part of two piano tech rehearsals I can tell you I’m extremely grateful that I’m in the pit! They amount of time the singers spend on stage working things out is amazing. I could never stand that long in any case, due to my back, but what boredom! It’s a kind of “hurry up and wait” thing, it seems. I left at almost 10:00 PM tonight and they had a long way to go! I’m impressed by their stamina.

Note about the opera: It’s interesting that the overture, the first act and the second act all end quietly. Unusual, really.

Okay … here’s another overture for you, this time conducting by Kent Nagano, and following that is the start of act one. (Sound isn’t quite in sync here.)

And wait, there’s more!

Hmmm. Interesting. That doesn’t look like ancient Greece to me!

Tomorrow I’ll post one of my favorite singers in the role of Idamante. Stay tuned!

Pretty funny!

01. September 2011 · Comments Off · Categories: NewToMyEars™

Giuseppe Martucci is new to my ears. My ears are happy.

I read about him here in a rather interesting story of a recent concert with Chicago and Muti:

Instead of making his final exit after his fifth bow, Muti turned to address the audience and began telling them of a great composer about whom they’d probably never heard: one Giuseppe Martucci.

Someone in the audience tittered, and Muti said sternly, “It is nothing to laugh (at).”

Another cackle, perhaps a nervous one, came from the seats, and Muti stood there silently with a look that…well, let’s just say, you don’t want a parent or anyone else in authority looking this way at you. Tension hung in the silence. Would he take his baton and leave?

No, he wouldn’t. “He was a great composer. He was a great conductor,” Muti continued, telling of Brahms’ and Mahler’s support of him and of Toscanini and the fascists, all while the audience listened intently.

The encore went over as it should have, frosting on a rich cake, and after three more bows, the evening was done.

Notturno per orchestra, op. 70
Giuseppe Sabbatini and thh Zagreb Philharmonic Orchestra

01. September 2011 · Comments Off · Categories: Opera · Tags: ,

… and we are on to orchestra rehearsal Number 4! Ciao for now … but here … listen to the overture:

01. September 2011 · Comments Off · Categories: FBQD

looking at my banking statement the only thing Ive spent money on is food and reed/oboe supplies

01. September 2011 · Comments Off · Categories: TQOD

i can play piano and oboe, oboe’s s**t and theres nothing good for piano so im using my skills to learn guitar ;)