Yes … plural.

Very fun. (It appears La Api is easier to do this with than Mozart!)

06. September 2011 · Comments Off on Rebecca Davis · Categories: Opera

During her college days, Rebecca Davis imagined she would be a country singer — especially after spending six months on the road with her aunt, Grammy-winning country performer Suzy Bogguss, singing backup on tunes like “Drive South.”
Davis remembers part of the chorus: We can go south with a smile on, Ain’t going to pack my nylons! Just leave these legs showin’, It gets hot down where we’re goin’.
The soprano’s impromptu performance, during an interview at the offices of Opera San Jose, doesn’t exactly conform to stereotypes of opera singers. But Davis, getting ready for a leading role in the company’s opening-night cast of Mozart’s “Idomeneo” at the California Theatre, could not care less.
She doesn’t even see that much of a leap from country to opera: “I liked singing country songs, because of the stories they tell. And I think that’s why I transitioned so well to opera. Because I love the stories.”

Do read the whole thing. I really enjoyed it!

Music, too often in history used for destructive ends, has the power to heal, to unite, even to help us reflect and understand.

I’m trying to understand the “used for destructive ends” thing … I’m sure I’m just clueless so I’m waiting on readers to help me with this. Got it?

06. September 2011 · Comments Off on ACappellaTuesday™ · Categories: ACappellaTuesday™

The beginning of this video brought back memories of singing in elementary school, so I HAD to put this up! None of my students know this song, so when they have it in their music book I always sing it for them! This group does it a bit better. How many of you remember “My Grandfather’s Clock”? This is a compilation, and you don’t get full songs in most cases, but I enjoyed it.

Warning, some “cheesy nudity” in this … you’ll see what I mean … sorry ’bout that, but well … can you “say cheese”? ;-)

Banchieri Singers

06. September 2011 · Comments Off on Levine Out, Luisi In · Categories: Opera, Press Releases

… in New York in any case. In other places Luisi has had to cancel. A lot. (Including San Francisco.)

News
New Injury Forces James Levine To Cancel Fall Performances

Fabio Luisi Is Named Met Principal Conductor; Will Lead New Production of Mozart’s Don Giovanni and Initial Performances of Wagner’s Siegfried

September 6, 2011

New York, NY (September 6, 2011) – After a fall last week that damaged one of his vertebrae, James Levine underwent emergency surgery on Thursday in New York, forcing him to withdraw from his performances at the Metropolitan Opera this fall. Levine was scheduled to begin orchestra rehearsals for the new season today. According to his doctors, he was successfully recuperating from another back surgery when the accident happened while he was on vacation in Vermont.

While Levine will continue in his position as Music Director, Fabio Luisi has been named the Met’s Principal Conductor, with the new appointment taking effect immediately. In April 2010, Luisi was appointed Principal Guest Conductor of the Met. He will replace Levine for most of the fall performances, conducting the new productions of Don Giovanni (premiering October 13) and Siegfried (premiering October 27), as well as the MET Orchestra concert at Carnegie Hall on October 16.

“While Jim’s latest setback is hugely disappointing for all of us, he joins me in welcoming Fabio’s larger role,” said Peter Gelb, the Met’s General Manager. “I am very pleased that Fabio was able to rearrange his fall schedule, and I appreciate the understanding of those companies with whom he was scheduled to conduct.”

In order to replace Levine, Luisi had to cancel performances with the Rome Opera, the Genoa Opera, the Vienna Symphony, and the San Francisco Symphony.

“I am honored to have been asked to take on these additional responsibilities, but my thoughts are also with Maestro Levine,” said Luisi.

RTWT

06. September 2011 · Comments Off on TQOD · Categories: TQOD

My cousin thinks that an oboe is a tuba, a clarinet is a trombone, and a cello is a violin.