A study conducted by researchers at the University of Bristol found that hens seem to prefer classical music when laying eggs.

The study was commissioned on a whim, says Alex Sheehan from Happy Egg Co., just to see if there were any positive benefits.

“We wanted to see if it would help them feel more comfortable or produce more eggs.”

Isabelle Pettersson from the University of Bristol said the impact music has on farm animals has been noted, but not specifically about hens and their musical tastes.

“We decided to investigate this further and find out whether music has a positive impact on hens, whether they have a preference for certain types of music, and also how it affects their laying habits.”

Classical, pop and rock were selected for the nest boxes, while the fourth had no music so researchers could see the hens’ behaviour and compare the reactions.

The music was played at varying periods during the day. Researchers visited the farm weekly over an eight-week period to collect data and ensure the investigation was running smoothly.

The hens did not lay more eggs overall, but they made more frequent visits to nest boxes where classical music was playing . Results revealed six percent more eggs laid in those boxes compared to the nest boxes playing songs by One Direction.

“Hens are sensitive to noise,” said Sheehan. “I don’t want to bash the artists, I like some of them, but classical music is just more soothing. It’s not as disruptive or loud.”

RTWT

… because classical is never disruptive or loud. Right? ;-)

1 Comment

  1. Boy, I really hate the notion that classical music is “soothing”. There’s a classical music radio station here in south Florida that runs commercials telling us how “relaxing” and “soothing” it is just to keep their station playing all day long. What an AWFUL way to sell the product!

    I cannot imagine any other performing art that would try to boast about how soporific it is. I mean, imagine a theater group extolling its production as a “soothing” experience! What action/adventure, or comedy film would advertise itself as “relaxing”? What art museum would sell its current exhibits in that way?

    This thinking goes to the root of why classical music audiences are shrinking; which is that musical arts administrators don’t really believe in their own product.