I wrote about this concert just the other day.

Now I ran across this article that includes the following:

The honeyed hum of his cello wafts through the large front window of Emil Miland’s gemütlich cottage on a seaside street in Pacifica, as his canine companion Diller surveils an arriving reporter. After greeting his guest, the cellist identifies the piece he’s practicing as The Despot’s Rule, The Slave’s Revenge, composed for him by Shinji Eshima. Miland is heralding of the New Year with two concerts, both of them involving old acquaintances, as well as new music.

Eshima, who’s a bass player as well as a composer, grew up alongside Miland in the 1970’s in the East Bay, and performed with him in the Oakland Youth Orchestra. Eshima’s piece for cello, piano, and marimba will be one of three on a January 11th program at Kohl Mansion in Burlingame, showcasing Miland and other musicians of the San Francisco Opera Orchestra (including pianist Steven Bailey and marimbist and tympanist Mark Veregge), with whom the cellist has been working for 27 years. The concert represents one of the month’s two homecomings for Miland; he first appeared in the 30-year-old Music at Kohl Mansion series when he was fresh out of the New England Conservatory.

“It’ll be an interesting concert,” the cellist promises. “Aside from Shinji’s piece, there’ll be the Mozart Oboe Quartet, with Janet Archibald on oboe, Kay Stern playing violin, Dawn Harms playing violin, and me. The second half is this huge piece by Erich Korngold, his Suite for two violins, cello, and piano left hand.”

Gee, I still need to buy my ticket! How ’bout you?

I don’t know the show but … once again, oboe as a college entrance key. Hah!

Back at home, Sue is trying to come up with new ways to get noticed on her college application. She’s trying to learn the oboe, because she read on the Internet that colleges LOVE students that play the oboe, and the Internet is always right.

Fun fact I learned during this episode—a poorly played oboe kind of sounds like a dying cat.

From something called The Middle, whatever that is.

I read it here.

Do you get my last email regarding the music lesson for my daughter? Please respond if you are available to offer private lesson.

Instrument:
Present teaching location:
Years teaching:

I await your urgent respond.

Thank you and get back…

Yet again, something I recommend ignoring. Clearly not a real request: note that there is no knowledge of what it is I teach nor any indication the person knows my location? Pretty much guarantees a scam.

What fun to hear Mr. Mayer say the things he says … especially when I’m in agreement! ;-) It’s always great to have what I believe to be true put into words by someone like him! I’m not saying I’m always right, but in these cases so much of what he is saying is exactly what I believe and say to my students. NOT that I manage to accomplish these things all the time.

“Too many ideas don’t mean better.” … “You have too much to say.” … “Simple.”

And what a fine oboist we get to hear, too. A brave soul, I might add! I sure wish I could tongue the way she does. Let me tell you, as you age your tongue gets slower. Truly.

“No one would dare to play it with slurs in Europe.” Sigh. Rossini is such a killer. But he goes on to say, after she tongues the darn thing, “I never heard it better!” Brava to Mary Lynch. You’ve got me beat … by a long shot!

And then the Brahms:

How funny … I use the same sort of example about repetition with more strength (“I told you to do your homework”), although I use different words. Maybe I’m not a bad teacher ….

By the way, Mary Lynch is now playing second oboe with Cleveland Orchestra.

Santa brought me four oboe reeds and an English horn reed