A slightly different version of the fifth symphony … I love this!

The group is Carmel Acappella. I’d heard them before, but I sure don’t remember this. I’m hoping it’s just that I hadn’t landed on this and not that my memory is that bad.

So … have a bad reed?

Just play.

Really.

You will have bad reeds sometimes. It happens. Everyone complains about them. but JUST PLAY. Give it a go. Make them work. Whining does us no good (well, okay, sometimes it’s kind of fun) and makes others rather annoyed with us. Besides it sounds like we are just making excuses and it also makes us look rather unprepared. When I have only bad reeds in the case I don’t get to tell a conductor, “Sorry, but I have only bad reeds so I’m going to skip playing today.”

We just have to play.

Learn to play well on bad reeds. It can be done. It’s not a lot of fun to do it, but it’s good to have a flexible enough embouchure (and attitude) that you can deal when you open the reed box and find only the misbehaving sort residing there.

PS Playing sure is work sometimes, isn’t it?

Classical music was my first love. It’s given me such extraordinary joy and has been a huge influence on my work, particularly in the classics, where you have to know where the coda comes and where the climax. You make your own symphony out of the words. I do regret that I didn’t continue studying classical piano, which I started to do as a kid.

—Christopher Plummer

I read it here.

Just read, via Opera San José’s Facebook page:
This day in Opera history – Handel’s opera “Rinaldo” premieres at Haymarket theatre in London in 1711.

So … well … this has to go up (although I’m sorry about the talking over the start):

… that doesn’t resemble an oboe. But I like it!

Screen Shot 2015-02-23 at 7.00.07 PM

I continue to be amazed at what can be named “oboe” … shoes, skirts, dresses, vases, dogs ….

Oboe players ONLY please: Do you have murse (man-purse)?

Um … okay then …

What’s your attraction to classical music?

There’s a lot of freedom in classical music. If you brought five versions of the same piece, they would sound totally different depending on the region, the conductor, the orchestra, all these different things. Because there’s a lot of wiggle room, even in composed music. It’s just great to play in a system that has rules, because it helps you refine freedom.

But coming as a jazz player, you don’t feel restricted by playing a pre-written piece?

I never really have a want for freedom. Classical music makes me a much better saxophonist than jazz does. Because for saxophone technique, guys end up playing fast stuff. In classical music, you just have to develop a technique to execute melodies and ideas that are beyond the linear ways that we tend to think about music. And that’s the challenge of it for me. I’m not really a linear thinker, although my dad [pianist Ellis Marsalis] is. A lot of classical composers are melodic thinkers, not linear thinkers. Some of these melodies can be quite difficult, and you’ve got to learn to play them under duress, which is different from playing them in a practice room.

You can read it all here. I didn’t put everything up, as I’m a bit more careful about “language”.

Chilcott: If Ye Love Me
NUS Choir; Nelson Kwei, Conductor

… Eight OBOES, that is!

Many thanks to Erin Hannigan for posting this on YouTube and giving me permission to post it here. Kudos to the oboists, and especially to Erin for her animal-saving ways. This was from an Artists for Animals Event, hosted by Operation Kindness.

More about Erin:

Vijay Singh: The Lord’s Prayer
Central Washington University Chamber Choir; Gary Weidenaar, Director