Received via email:

Dear California oboe friends,

I am thrilled to host a masterclass by Scott Hostetler, English horn for the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, at UC Santa Barbara on Saturday, Oct. 21, 1-3:30pm. Scott was my teacher at Northwestern University, where he still teaches, and he also teaches at the John Mack Oboe Camp in North Carolina. The event is FREE and open to the public. More importantly, I still have performances spaces for the masterclass available. Please let me know if you or your students (advanced high school and up) are interested in playing or attending. Performers are free to play anything they wish, be it oboe or English horn, excerpts or solo repertory.

More information can be found here: music.ucsb.edu/news/event/1394. There is also a facebook event page: www.facebook.com/events/480584135647151/ I have attached a flyer; feel free to send it along to anyone who might be interested. Hope to see you there!

Gabrielle

I urge any who can attend to go hear this recital. I heard Mingjia play the Britten and was just blown away! I wish like anything I could go to this, but I have a conflict. Rats!

From Mingjia:

J. Reese Norris: An Old Irish Blessing
CoroRio Choris

Light of a Clear Blue Morning

Just because.

Stephen Paulus: Pilgrim’s Hymn (from The Three Hermits)
The Concordia choir; Rene Clausen, Conductor

When is first saw the video I thought the oboist was trying to get water out of his octave key, yet I didn’t hear any issue that implied the octave key had an issue. After reading this article it makes more sense: his reed cracked!

Yep, that happens. NOT fun, believe me!

Opera San José will be doing a rather new opera in December. It’s also “young” … the composer is eleven or twelve at this point, I believe.

I just landed on this documentary. Fascinating.

The opera is being presented by the Packard Humanities Institute and Opera San José.

Victoria: Requiem: Agnus Dei
Ensemble Corund; Stephen Smith, Conductor

Paul Basler: Alleluia
Vandegrift High School Chorale (Women); Michael Feris, Conductor; Instrumentalists are sadly not named

(Sorry the YouTube page requires you to go directly to their video. I didn’t realize that until the day of the posting!)

My mother was a singer and my father was a composer, musicologist, and string player. My father was very analytical, so I had really good training in that way. I started playing the Bach Suites—the first suite is all about patterns and change—just little snippets at a time, two measures a day. By connecting them, you actually are figuring out in a pretty substantial way, what are the patterns? So in a short time, I was able to learn a lot of music. A little bit is doable. It’s not Mount Everest—it’s a mole hill. My father would say, “If there’s something that’s very difficult, split it into four parts where you can actually solve a problem by first solving little problems.” That was an unbelievable time-saver later on. And my mother really addressed the idea that you acquire technique in order to transcend it. Because the point of music is to be moved. Just because you can play a piece doesn’t mean you’re reaching deep inside somebody else.

But there’s so much more. Do read it all!