A bit of lovely …

Robert Schumann: Six Pieces in Canonical Form Op. 56 (Arr. for Oboe, Cello & Piano)
II. Mit innigem Ausdruck

Céline Moinet, Oboe
Norbert Anger, Cello
Florian Uhlig, Piano

Just because …

Gian Carlo Menotti: To This We’ve Come, from The Consul
Patricia Neway

To this we’ve come,
That men withhold the world from men
No ship, no shore for him who drowns at sea,
No home nor grave for him who dies on land.
To this we’ve come,
That man be born a stranger upon god’s Earth
That he be chosen without a chance for choice;
That he be hunted without the hope of refuge.
To this we’ve come. To this we’ve come.
And you, you too shall weep
If to men not to God we now must pray
Tell me secretary tell me, who are these men?
If to them not to God we now must pray
Tell me, secretary, tell me:
Who are these dark archangels?
Will they be conquered?
Will they be doomed?
Is there one, anyone behind those doors
To whom the heart can still be explained
Is there one anyone who still may care?

Oh, the day will come I know
When our heart’s a flame
Will burn your paper chains
Warn the consul, secretary, warn him
That day neither ink nor seal
Shall cage our souls
That day will come.
That day will come.

Keve and Rachel play one of Cenovia Cummins oboe/violin duets. For music, please visit www.cenoviacummins.com
Recording engineer: Scott Petito. Videographer: Alexandra Dewez
Filmed in Catskill, NY

06. March 2019 · Write a comment · Categories: Listen · Tags:

This, from VOCES8 and Rachel Podger:

As we begin the season of Lent, we reflect on passages from psalms 79 and 103. Set to music by James MacMillan, we have relished performing ‘Domine non secundum peccata nostra’ with Rachel Podger as part of our ‘A Guardian Angel’ collaboration, including in this performance in Brecon Cathedral.

TEXT
Domine, non secundum peccata nostra, quae fecimus nos: neque secundum iniquitates nostras retribuas nobis. Domine, ne memineris iniquitatum nostrarum antiquarum: cito anticipent nos misericordiae tuae, quia pauperes facti sumus nimis.
Adjuva nos, Deus salutaris noster: et propter gloria nominis tui, Domine, libera nos: et propitius esto peccatis nostris, propter nomen tuum.

TRANSLATION
O Lord, repay us not according to the sins we have committed, nor according to our iniquities. O Lord, remember not out former iniquities: let Thy mercies speedily prevent us, for we are become exceeding poor.
Help us, O God, our Saviour: and the glory of Thy Name,
O Lord, deliver us: and forgive our sins for Thy Name’s sake.

… for your Thursday morning and the last day of February. Lovely playing here!

Kumho Prodigy Concert
Soo Hyun Jee, Oboe
Eugène Bozza: Fantasie Pastorale for Oboe and Piano, Op.37
Recorded at the Kumho Art Hall, 15 December 2018
http://www.kumhoarthall.com
KUMHO ART HALL V LIVE – http://channels.vlive.tv/E792F3/video

… or maybe a little bit more than a little! What fun this is.

Kumho Young Artist Opening Concert
Seong Ye Ma, Oboe
Alyssa Morris
Alyssa Morris: 4 Personalities for Oboe and Piano (excerpts)
Yellow | Blue | Red
Recorded at the Kumho Art Hall, 5 January, 2019
http://www.kumhoarthall.com
KUMHO ART HALL V LIVE – http://channels.vlive.tv/E792F3/video

… but the video? Well, it made me laugh. I don’t know if others will react the same way or not.

Albrecht Mayer is one of my all time favorite oboists. He is musical. His technique is fabulous. He’s just a great musician.

Still, this video. I don’t mind the bits where he is out and about, but playing oboe outside in various areas? Hm. Well, I stopped looking and just listened. Agree? Disagree? You tell me!

Preview, download or stream: https://DG.lnk.to/mayer-tesori. Listen to the 1st Movement of Vivaldi’s “Oboe Concerto In C Major [R450]” played by Albrecht Mayer. With his new album Tesori d’Italia, Albrecht Mayer again extends the oboe’s concerto repertory: apart from Vivaldi’s Oboe Concerto in C major RV 450 he presents virtually unknown works by Italian Baroque masters, including two world premiere recordings of concertos by Giuseppe Sammartini and Domenico Elmi.

Because I love it.

06. January 2019 · Comments Off on A Bit of Lovely · Categories: Listen, vocal

… by a composer new to me. Have any of you heard of Muriel Herbert?

The Lost Nightingale
Dame Sarah Connolly and Joseph Middleton

The Lost Nightingale

Alcuin of York , translated by Helen Jane Waddell

Whoever stole you from that bush of broom,
I think he envied me my happiness,
O little nightingale, for many a time
You lightened my sad heart from its distress,
And flooded my whole soul with melody,
And I would have the other birds all come,
And sing along with me thy threnody.
So brown and dim that little body was,
But none could scorn thy singing. In that throat,
That tiny throat, what depth of harmony,
And all night long, ringing that changing note,
What marvel if the cherubim in heaven
Continually do praise Him, when to thee,
O small and happy, such a grace was given?

from Medieval Latin Lyrics (1929)

05. January 2019 · Comments Off on Because it speaks to my heart. · Categories: Choral, Listen

I am very much a “heart music” person. The funny thing is when I try to explain what music can do to me I describe it more as being stabbed in the gut. But no one would want to hear “I’m a stomach music” sort. Right?

In any case, this … this is truly lovely. The poem is by Sara Teasdale. She appears so frequently in music. Her story, though, is a sad one and, as seems to happen with a lot of poets, she took her own life.

www.elainehagenberg.com
“Music of Stillness” by Elaine Hagenberg
poem by Sara Teasdale
Performed by Oxford Singers
Conducted by Bob Chilcott
Published by Oxford University Press

There will be rest, and sure stars shining
Over the roof-tops crowned with snow,
A reign of rest, serene forgetting,
The music of stillness holy and low.
I will make this world of my devising
Out of a dream in my lonely mind.
I shall find the crystal of peace, – above me
Stars I shall find.