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Orlando di Lasso: Missa Bell’ Amfitrit’ altera
El León de Oro; Maro Antonio Garcia de Paz, Director

Rheinberger: Dein Sind die Himmel
Sofia Kammarkör

Josu Elberdin: Pater noster (Our Father)
Grupo Vocal Elkhos; Carlos Gorritxo, Director

(I tend to think of oboes in the same way I think about cameras. If you know me you might know what I mean. If not, well … I guess you can always ask!)

Yamaha introduces the YOB-831 & YOB-831L oboes-long-awaited updates that increase warmth in the sound while retaining the bright and responsive feel for the player.
New features include a redesigned, thicker bell along with a unique taper and flare that promote a powerful sound with rich overtones. A new tone hole design has well-defined edges to provide increased resonance.
Additionally, unprecedented consistency and production precision of the 831L Duet+ model is due to the “ebonite” upper joint liner. The synthetic wood doesn’t contract or expand, resulting in outstanding overall performance and reliability.
“Players are increasingly demanding high-quality and even higher-performing instruments,” said Brian Petterson, marketing manager, wind instruments, Yamaha Corporation of America. “Increasing the range of tone colors to include the warmer end of the spectrum will make this oboe increasingly popular with modern professionals and students alike. The consistent high quality in production expertly combines craftsmanship and technology, and the greatly increased range of sound characters make this oboe more exciting than anything else currently on the market.”
Pricing and Availability
Yamaha YOB-831 (MSRP: $9,239) and YOB-831L (MSRP: $10,608) will ship in January 2018.
For more information, visit the Yamaha Booth at the 2018 NAMM Show in the Anaheim Marriott Hotel, Marquis Ballroom, January 25-28, 2018, or 4wrd.it/YamahaOboes

Lapland, anyone?

Go here for the links.

There are a number of other openings as well. Check ’em out!

In addition, we are in for some musical chairs in the U.S. for a time, I do believe. It’s going to be interesting to see how this all pans out in the long run.

(If you have trouble with dissonance — I know someone in particular who has medical issues that won’t allow for that — you will want to stop after the first half of this video.)

J. S. Bach: Come Sweet Death, arr. Rhonda Sandberg
Sophia Youth Choir; Alexey Shamritsky

J. S. Bach: Singet dem Nerrn ein Neues Lied, BWV 225
Luthers Bach Ensemble; Ton Koopman, Conductor

with Eugene Izotov, Mingjia Liu, and Russ deLuna

And now I’m even MORE humbled, hearing Mr. Izotov play piano.

From Mr. Izotov’s page: Some terrific playing by our wonderful students Tim Daniels and Casey Kearney:

Rachmaninov: Tebe Poem
Sophia Youth Choir; Alexey Shamritsky, Conductor

The Philadelphia Orchestra has settled on a finalist for its coveted principal oboist job, and he has been invited to play tryouts in upcoming concerts.

Nathan Hughes, a principal oboist with the Metropolitan Opera orchestra, has not been offered the job, much less signed a contract, but he has emerged as the only finalist after several days of auditions.

The hiring process isn’t concluded, said orchestra spokeswoman Ashley Berke. In fact, Hughes might not end up in Philadelphia, but in Chicago, where the oboist says he is also expecting to play tryout concerts with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra that have yet to be scheduled.

“It’s hard to say what will happen. I don’t want to get ahead of myself,” said Hughes Sunday, a day after his final audition in Philadelphia. “These are amazing orchestras, and the process isn’t over until everything is decided. Having us play in the orchestra is a great way to find out what musicians are like. It’s different from the audition, where you are hearing them alone mostly.”

I read it here.